updated 5:56 PM MDT, Oct 13, 2017

Nokia Lumia 830 review



When Nokia released the Lumia Icon earlier this year, it took its polycarbonate design philosophy and went a bit metal -- aluminum, specifically. The result was a premium phone with a fancy body to match. But the Icon's exclusivity on Verizon limited its appeal, and its sibling, the Lumia 930, has yet to make it to US shores. Into that void comes the Lumia 830, from the freshly minted Microsoft Mobile.

  • Written by Abdullahi
  • Category: SMART PHONES

Samsung announces slim, full metal Galaxy A3 and A5 smartphones, at last

  • Written by Abdullahi
  • Category: SMART PHONES

Lumia 735 review: more than just a selfie phone


Nokia Lumia 735 and yours truly © AOL Nokia Lumia 735 and yours truly

Last year's Lumia 720 was an awkward middle child. It was more powerful than its 620 cousin, but not so much so that you'd consider it over the 820 unless you just had to have the first budget Lumia with LTE. If you're going to pay a lot more, why not get a lot more? Flash forward to 2014, and the Lumia 735 follow-up (along with the dual-SIM 730) appears to have more of a reason for being -- namely, catering to a selfie-loving public. With a 5-megapixel front-facing camera, more powerful internals and a €219 ($279) price, the 735 promises great self-portraits without decimating your bank account. But is it necessarily your best choice for those "I was there" photos? And more importantly, is it worth buying over both other Windows Phones and the other devices in its price class? You're about to find out.

  • Written by Abdullahi
  • Category: SMART PHONES

Reviewers were far from kind to Amazon’s Fire Phone, the company’s first ever smartphone, and it seems that customers took the hint.

Reviewers were far from kind to Amazon’s Fire Phone, the company’s first ever smartphone, and it seems that customers took the hint.

In this week’s earnings call the company announced that it was writing off $83 million of Fire Phone inventory (out of a $170m write-down “primarily related” to overestimating the devices popularity).

It’s not clear exactly what this figure means in terms of numbers of units but – as The Guardian’s Charles Arthur suggests – we can estimate that Amazon was expecting $400 in revenue from the $600 pricetag (this puts the costs and labour price of the Fire Phone at the same as that of the iPhone 6: $200) meaning that they likely have in excess of 200,000 unsold devices.

  • Written by Abdullahi
  • Category: SMART PHONES
 
 

 

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